Juan Cristobal Zagal's Publications

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Recent Progress at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer

Markus Scholler, - Several Authors -, and Juan Cristobal Zagal. Recent Progress at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer. In Advances in Stellar Interferometry, Proceedings of SPIE 6268, 2006.

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Abstract

The ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) is the first general-user interferometer that offers near- and mid-infrared long-baseline interferometric observations in service and visitor mode to the whole astronomical community. Over the last two years, the VLTI has moved into its regular science operation mode with the two science instruments, MIDI and AMBER, both on all four 8m Unit Telescopes and the first three 1.8m Auxiliary Telescopes. We are currently devoting up to half of the available time for science, the rest is used for characterization and improvement of the existing system, plus additional installations. Since the first fringes with the VLTI on a star were obtained on March 17, 2001, there have been five years of scientific observations, with the different instruments, different telescopes and baselines. These observations have led so far to more than 40 refereed publications. We describe the current status of the VLTI and give an outlook for its near future.

BibTeX
@InProceedings{zagal2006,
  author = 	 {Markus Scholler and {- Several Authors -} and Juan Cristobal Zagal},
  title = 	 {Recent Progress at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer},
  OPTcrossref =  {},
  OPTkey = 	 {},
  booktitle = {Advances in Stellar Interferometry},
  OPTpages = 	 {},
  year = 	 {2006},
  OPTeditor = 	 {John D. Monnier and Markus Schoeller and William C. Danchi},
  volume = 	 {6268},
  OPTnumber = 	 {},
  series = 	 {Proceedings of SPIE},
  OPTaddress = 	 {},
  OPTmonth = 	 {},
  organization = SPIE,
  OPTpublisher = {},
  OPTnote = 	 {},
  OPTannote = 	 {},
  abstract = {The ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) is
                  the first general-user interferometer that offers
                  near- and mid-infrared long-baseline interferometric
                  observations in service and visitor mode to the
                  whole astronomical community. Over the last two
                  years, the VLTI has moved into its regular science
                  operation mode with the two science instruments,
                  MIDI and AMBER, both on all four 8m Unit Telescopes
                  and the first three 1.8m Auxiliary Telescopes. We
                  are currently devoting up to half of the available
                  time for science, the rest is used for
                  characterization and improvement of the existing
                  system, plus additional installations. Since the
                  first fringes with the VLTI on a star were obtained
                  on March 17, 2001, there have been five years of
                  scientific observations, with the different
                  instruments, different telescopes and
                  baselines. These observations have led so far to
                  more than 40 refereed publications. We describe the
                  current status of the VLTI and give an outlook for
                  its near future. },
}

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